Welcome to SKWD website
Brief History

Presidential Decree 198, as amended, otherwise known as Provincial Water Utilities Act of 1973, authorized the foundation of local water districts, and by virtue of the enabling act of the Sangguniang Bayan of then municipality of Tacurong, through its duly approved Resolution No. #82-66 dated October 22, 1982 – Tacurong Water District was created. It was operated under the management of a Sangguniang bayan member with 132 connections when it started.

On August 5, 1983, Local Water Utilities Administration (LWUA) under the chairmanship of Alfredo L. Juinio, the Tacurong Water District had been issued Certificate of Conformance No. 247, in recognizance of the humble efforts to improve the domestic water service to the public. With the modernization project plan worth

P16.6 million and the support of neighboring water districts of Cotabato City and Koronadal, as well as the appointment of a new general Manager, Tacurong Water District’s operations was revived and 100% meterization was fully implemented.

The Sangguniang Bayan of Isulan passed and approved a board resolution requesting Tacurong Water District for the annexation of Isulan as part of the expansion process, and it was the main reason for the approval of another board resolution changing Tacurong Water District into Sultan Kudarat Water District. The municipality of Esperanza was later annexed as part of the coverage area.

Sultan Kudarat Water District struggled, thrived and improved its services and that on 1995, LWUA recognized SKWD as the most outstanding water district – medium category. To this day, SKWD strives to serve the people of Sultan Kudarat with safe and reliable water supply, upholding its thrust, “SERVICE IS OUR COMMITMENT, HEALTH IS OUR CONCERN”.



National Budget Circular 542

National Budget Circular 542, issued by the Department of Budget and Management on August 29, 2012, reiterates compliance with Section 93 of the General Appropriations Act of FY2012. Section 93 is the Transparency Seal provision, to wit:

Sec. 93. Transparency Seal. To enhance transparency and enforce accountability, all national government agencies shall maintain a transparency seal on their official websites. The transparency seal shall contain the following information:
(i) the agency’s mandates and functions, names of its officials with their position and designation, and contact information; (ii) annual reports, as required under National Budget Circular Nos. 507 and 507-A dated January 31, 2007 and June 12, 2007, respectively, for the last three (3) years;
(iii) their respective approved budgets and corresponding targets immediately upon approval of this Act;
(iv) major programs and projects categorized in accordance with the five key results areas under E.O. No. 43, s. 2011;
(v) the program/projects beneficiaries as identified in the applicable special provisions;
(vi) status of implementation and program/project evaluation and/or assessment reports; and
(vii) annual procurement plan, contracts awarded and the name of contractors/suppliers/consultants.

The respective heads of the agencies shall be responsible for ensuring compliance with this section. A Transparency Seal, prominently displayed on the main page of the website of a particular government agency, is a certificate that it has complied with the requirements of Section 93. This Seal links to a page within the agency’s website which contains an index of downloadable items of each of the above-mentioned documents.

Freedom of Information